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Can I age non Cuban cigar?
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Picture of shidoni
posted
I'd really like to know, from a professional point of view. Can I age Non Cuban Cigars successfully?

I ask because I recently made too many box purchases and I'm estimating that some of those are going to be in the walk in for quite a few years. Am I going to be shedding a tear or two because my Non Cubans will already be bland by the time I get to smoke them?
 
Posts: 56 | Location: Philippines | Registered: March 19, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of SubChop
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quote:
Originally posted by shidoni:
I'd really like to know, from a professional point of view. Can I age Non Cuban Cigars successfully?

I ask because I recently made too many box purchases and I'm estimating that some of those are going to be in the walk in for quite a few years. Am I going to be shedding a tear or two because my Non Cubans will already be bland by the time I get to smoke them?


As long as they are properly maintained (humidity/temp) any cigar will age.
 
Posts: 2834 | Location: New England | Registered: August 03, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of IB Vitola
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quote:
Originally posted by SubChop:
quote:
Originally posted by shidoni:
I'd really like to know, from a professional point of view. Can I age Non Cuban Cigars successfully?

I ask because I recently made too many box purchases and I'm estimating that some of those are going to be in the walk in for quite a few years. Am I going to be shedding a tear or two because my Non Cubans will already be bland by the time I get to smoke them?


As long as they are properly maintained (humidity/temp) any cigar will age.


X2


Ay! fo'ggeta 'bout it... I'm bustin' beans over here, eh!
 
Posts: 176 | Location: Some where in the woods, Pacific Southwest. | Registered: November 03, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of shidoni
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Thanks. I was getting a bit worried that the NCs especially the mild ones, would be very bland by the time I get to smoke them.

I did put them in individual Lock n Lock containers. I'm hoping that the air tightness of the container will help preserve the flavors.

Thanks for the help.
 
Posts: 56 | Location: Philippines | Registered: March 19, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Im sure you can, but there is always a discussion if non cuban cigars can age just as well as cuban cigars can.
I dont see why not, but alot of people will say otherwise
 
Posts: 586 | Location: Toronto, Ontario | Registered: December 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of SubChop
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quote:
Originally posted by shidoni:
Thanks. I was getting a bit worried that the NCs especially the mild ones, would be very bland by the time I get to smoke them.

I did put them in individual Lock n Lock containers. I'm hoping that the air tightness of the container will help preserve the flavors.

Thanks for the help.


Some will store them all together (without the air tight containers) to let them 'marry' with one another.
 
Posts: 2834 | Location: New England | Registered: August 03, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of David Savona
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You most certainly can. I'm aging some Padróns and Fuentes as we speak. I've smoked older versions of both cigars and have found them to age quite well.

Not every cigar ages well, regardless of whether it's Cuban or from somewhere else. We've found that high quality cigars with stronger flavors are the best candidates for aging.

Take a look at this video showing Gordon and myself "raiding" one of Greg Mottola's humidors. We found a few old non Cuban cigars in there.

http://bcove.me/eq1sg81q
 
Posts: 3170 | Location: New York, NY | Registered: April 23, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of shidoni
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quote:
Originally posted by SubChop:
quote:
Originally posted by shidoni:
Thanks. I was getting a bit worried that the NCs especially the mild ones, would be very bland by the time I get to smoke them.

I did put them in individual Lock n Lock containers. I'm hoping that the air tightness of the container will help preserve the flavors.

Thanks for the help.


Some will store them all together (without the air tight containers) to let them 'marry' with one another.


Sorry for the confusion. I meant I put individual box of 25's cigars in their own airtight container. To allow them to marry.

Thanks fellas, you guys put my mind at ease. All I have to worry about know is keeping the rh and temp near perfect.
 
Posts: 56 | Location: Philippines | Registered: March 19, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of shidoni
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quote:
Originally posted by David Savona:
You most certainly can. I'm aging some Padróns and Fuentes as we speak. I've smoked older versions of both cigars and have found them to age quite well.

Not every cigar ages well, regardless of whether it's Cuban or from somewhere else. We've found that high quality cigars with stronger flavors are the best candidates for aging.

Take a look at this video showing Gordon and myself "raiding" one of Greg Mottola's humidors. We found a few old non Cuban cigars in there.

http://bcove.me/eq1sg81q


Those are some really old cigars, I hope they're insured lol.

Thanks David. Luckily only a few of my over purchased cigars are mild. I'll see that they get smoked first.
 
Posts: 56 | Location: Philippines | Registered: March 19, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of SteveSur
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A lot of premium NCs are fully aged when you buy them and will not get much better (a matter of taste) with more age.

A perfect example are some boxes of Padilla 1932 Churchills that I have. When they were bought, they had box codes that indicated they had about one year of age and they smoked great then.

After a couple more years of age, they lost their spicy edge and became bland. To the novice, this may be good, but to a seasoned smoker, they lost some of their attributes through aging.

***************************************
(This is an older post of mine)

I had to bring this topic back to life because of my recent experience aging one of my favorite NCs, the original blend of Padilla Signature 1932.

I’ve had two boxes, (both Churchills) for about two years, and both boxes had eight months on them when they were purchased. So they’re almost three years aged. During this time I’ve managed to smoke through one box and I’m half-way through the second.

What has happened to most I’ve smoked from the second box is they have mellowed so much that they are actually getting quite bland, which I’d never thought I would say about a 32.

My guess would be the peak aging for these cigars is somewhere around two years and no-longer. I can remember smoking them right off the truck when they had eight months age and they were simply outrageous, one of the best NCs I've ever had.

So, if you have any of these stashed, don’t let them get too old, you may regret it.
********************************************

This message has been edited. Last edited by: SteveSur,


(_________]]]~~
 
Posts: 3717 | Location: Woodbury, Connecticut | Registered: November 01, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of shidoni
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by SteveSur:
A lot of premium NCs are fully aged when you buy them and will not get much better (a matter of taste) with more age.

A perfect example are some boxes of Padilla 1932 Churchills that I have. When they were bought, they had box codes that indicated they had about one year of age and they smoked great then.

After a couple more years of age, they lost their spicy edge and became bland. To the novice, this may be good, but to a seasoned smoker, they lost some of their attributes through aging.

***************************************
(This is an older post of mine)

I had to bring this topic back to life because of my recent experience aging one of my favorite NCs, the original blend of Padilla Signature 1932.

I’ve had two boxes, (both Churchills) for about two years, and both boxes had eight months on them when they were purchased. So they’re almost three years aged. During this time I’ve managed to smoke through one box and I’m half-way through the second.

What has happened to most I’ve smoked from the second box is they have mellowed so much that they are actually getting quite bland, which I’d never thought I would say about a 32.

My guess would be the peak aging for these cigars is somewhere around two years and no-longer. I can remember smoking them right off the truck when they had eight months age and they were simply outrageous, one of the best NCs I've ever had.

So, if you have any of these stashed, don’t let them get too old, you may regret it.
********************************************


I see. Seems like the most common answer (various forums) to NCs is 1 year minimum to 2-3 years maximum. Than they slowly start going bland from there.

Plus some gems that will last decades.

Ahhh, the trouble is finding which are gems and which are not so.

No I don't have those, your description is making me want to purchase a box. But I must resist the temptation. I already have way way too much to smoke for about a decade since I only smoke about 2 a day.
 
Posts: 56 | Location: Philippines | Registered: March 19, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of thaterp
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quote:
I see. Seems like the most common answer (various forums) to NCs is 1 year minimum to 2-3 years maximum. Than they slowly start going bland from there.

Plus some gems that will last decades.

Ahhh, the trouble is finding which are gems and which are not so.

No I don't have those, your description is making me want to purchase a box. But I must resist the temptation. I already have way way too much to smoke for about a decade since I only smoke about 2 a day.

usually, the fuller bodied cigar, the better they age. i have had some good success with some JdN Antanos and some done pepin stuff, particularly the cuban classics. some of the milder cigars will lose some of their character the longer they are stored, but the peppery smokes tend to mellow and smooth out.


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Posts: 8486 | Location: Maryland | Registered: September 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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